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Entries in vegan (14)

Sunday
Jul192015

Orange Glazed Tempeh with Veetee Rice 

I love how whole grains like rice, quinoa and steel cuts oats are now available fully cooked and frozen, so you can microwave for a few minutes and eat. I also cook grains the old-fashioned way on the stove, but on chaotic days I appreciate having these packages in the freezer.

Veetee, a company originally from the U.K., has created a line of precooked rices that are shelf-stable without artificial additives. You either microwave for two minutes or add the rice directly to a cooked dish like a stir-fry. Veetee sent me a case of various flavors to try out. They offer plain versions of jasmine, basmati, and brown as well as low fat savory flavors of Chicken, Golden Vegetable, and Thai Lime & Herb. All the varieties of Veetee tasted fluffy and soft after heating up. The only downside is that they're high in sodium, a common trait in packaged flavored rices. At least Uncle Ben's Ready Rice offers a sodium-free whole grain brown rice. Even Veetee's "plain" brown rice has 290 mg per 3/4 cup serving (each package provides two servings). The Golden Vegetable version has 780 mg per serving, though keep in mind it's not hard to eat the whole package of 1 1/2 cups of rice so the sodium doubles.

Still, I find flavored rices useful because I don't have to add extra seasonings. To lower the sodium content I'll blend half flavored rice with half plain brown rice. This was the case when I cooked up the tempeh recipe below.

I've been meaning to tackle tempeh now that I'm pretty comfortable with tofu. Per serving, tempeh is higher in protein and fiber than tofu. However it's got an odd, offputting flavor out of the package that definitely needs enhancement! I found a simple yet very flavorful recipe by KathEats for tempeh with an orange marmalade glaze. You sear tempeh in some oil for a few minutes until browned, then pour on a mixture of orange marmalade, olive oil, soy sauce and crushed garlic, cooking for a few more minutes until the glaze thickens. I added a half cup of Veetee Golden Vegetable Rice blended with a cup of my plain brown rice, carrot, chopped kale and sesame seeds. 

I don't know what magical thing happened when I poured that orange mixture onto the tempeh but the savory aroma was amazing. My son Jake asked if I'd gotten Chinese takeout. The tempeh tasted like a rich Chinese meat dish. The recipe was fast, made even quicker and tastier with the precooked Veetee rice. Super filling, super nutritious!

Check out Veetee rice soon! They're now available at Hannaford supermarkets and Amazon.com.

Disclosure: I received free samples of Veetee Rices to help facilitate this post. The recipe, thoughts and opinions expressed are my own.

Tuesday
Apr072015

Quick and Easy Granola Bars

If I can take any kind of shortcut with cooking, I will find it! So when I say these bars are quick and easy, you can trust they are. This recipe has four ingredients and needs only a saucepan and baking dish. Goes into the oven for about 20 minutes. I eat a packaged granola bar every day because it's convenient and satisfying, so I loved this homemade version from Diary of a Fit Mommy. She used three ingredients that most people already have in their kitchens. I only changed it by adding one more ingredient of a chia/flaxseed blend sprinkled on top of the bars before baking.

Easy Granola Bars

Ingredients

3/4 cup honey

1 cup peanut or almond butter (or sunflower seed butter if nut allergies)

3 cups old fashioned oats

Chia, ground flaxseeds

Directions

  1. Preheat oven to 350 F.
  2. On low heat, add peanut butter and honey into a medium saucepan and stir until melted. Remove from heat.
  3. Pour oats into the mixture and stir well until combined. 
  4. Pour batter into a 9-inch baking pan. Sprinkle the seeds evenly over the top. Bake for 15-20 minutes, until top is firm to touch.
  5. Cool well before cutting into squares.

The one downside with these bars is that they're crumbly. When trying to cut them into squares, some fell apart. So I saved the crumbles in a Tupperware and have been sprinkling them into my Greek yogurt and oatmeal...or just eating a spoonful when I need a quick pick-me-up! 

 

Sunday
Mar152015

Black Rice with Edamame, Sweet Potato and Cashews

Have you checked out the whole grains section of your supermarket? No more will you only see brown or white rice, but quinoa, millet, farro, freekeh and even black rice. My Asian parents have mentioned black rice but never cooked with it because of the higher cost. This black-purplish rice is also called "forbidden rice" because only the richest of society in ancient China (i.e., emperors) were allowed to eat it.

Thankfully times have changed; I easily found it at Trader Joe's and a client Patrick had bought it at Ocean State Job Lot! Patrick first inspired me to cook with it. He had come to me moderately overweight with cholesterol levels in the 300s and said that despite drinking green smoothies from a Magic Bullet and walking more, his cholesterol wouldn't budge, which he wrote off as being genetically inherited. He refused to take a statin so we tweaked his diet to increase the fiber with more whole fruits, vegetables, nuts/seeds and whole grains while avoiding saturated fat and excess cholesterol. He started a regular exercise regimen (he chose P90X which could be done at home). After 4-5 months, his cholesterol dropped to 165better than mine! Patrick is just one of several folks I've counseled who were convinced their genes caused the bad numbers...but were proven wrong when adjusting their diet and exercise level. Some but not all were also using medication. Food is healing!

Black rice is colored by its anthocyanin content, an antioxidant that also pigments blueberries, purple grapes, red wine, tart cherries, plums and eggplant. Black rice, similar to brown, retains the outer high fiber bran layer so its texture is chewier and nuttier than white. Research shows that anthocyanins can decrease inflammation in the body, and therefore may reduce the risk of inflammatory conditions such as cancer and heart disease. Nutrition-wise it's comparable to brown rice with more fiber, protein and iron than white rice. I simply love the taste! 

Patrick shared this favorite cholesterol-lowering recipe for Forbidden Rice Salad by the Get Off Your Tush & Cook blog, which I made today as you can see in the photos. Very easy to prepare with a quick dressing. The only things I changed were using canola instead of sesame oil, and adding cashews instead of sesame seeds. Also, though I would have loved the flavor of roasted sweet potato, I didn't feel like turning on the oven so I microwaved them for 6 minutes. The edamame, crispy bell peppers and green onion rounded out the flavors and textures. The dish tasted great warm, chilled or at room temperature. 

A few notes about preparing the black rice: Because the package didn't specify to rinse the rice, I only rinsed quickly before cooking. I noticed the water immediately turned purple throughout cooking. I used a ratio of 2 parts water to 1 part rice. After the 30-minute cook time, the texture was perfect but it looked gloppy. So I rinsed off the excess glop and it was fine. In the future I plan to rinse the rice well before cooking and reduce the cooking water (1 3/4 water to 1 cup rice). Try out the recipe if you enjoy brown rice, I'm sure you will love it!